DevOps 360
What is DevOps?

What is DevOps?

DevOps brings people, processes, and technology together to provide better solutions to clients more quickly.

DevOps definition

DevOps, a combination of development (Dev) and operations (Ops), is the collaboration of people, processes, and technology to continuously give value to consumers.

What does DevOps imply for organizations? DevOps allows traditionally divided disciplines like development, IT operations, quality engineering, and security to interact and coordinate to create better, higher dependable products. Teams may better respond to customer requests, boost trust in the apps they produce and achieve business goals quicker by adopting a DevOps culture and using DevOps principles and technologies.

The benefits of DevOps

Teams who accept DevOps’ culture, methods, and technologies become high-performing, producing better products quicker and with more customer satisfaction. Improved teamwork and efficiency are also necessary for accomplishing company objectives such as these:

  • Getting to market faster
  • Adapting to market conditions and competition
  • Keeping the system stable and reliable
  • Increasing the recovery time average

DevOps and the application lifecycle

Throughout the plan, develop, deliver, and operate phases of an application’s lifetime, DevOps has an impact. Each phase is dependent on the others, and there are no roles assigned to the phases. Each position is involved to some level in each phase in a real DevOps culture.

  • Plan – DevOps teams use the planning phase to brainstorm, define, and explain the features and capabilities of the apps and systems they’re creating. They keep track of progress at all levels of granularity, from single-product projects to activities spanning many product portfolios. Backlogs, issue tracking, Scrum management, Kanban boards, and dashboards are just a few of the ways DevOps teams prepare with agility and visibility
  • Develop – The development phase covers all aspects of coding, including developing, testing, reviewing, and integrating code by team members, as well as transforming that code into build artifacts that can be deployed in multiple contexts. DevOps teams strive to develop quickly while maintaining quality, stability, and productivity. They accomplish this by employing highly productive tools, automating monotonous and manual tasks, and iterating in small increments via automated testing and continuous integration
  • Deliver – Delivery refers to the process of consistently and reliably distributing software into production environments. The deployment and configuration of the fully controlled core infrastructure that supports these environments are also part of the delivery phase. Teams create a release management procedure with defined manual approval phases during the delivery phase. They also build up automatic gates that transport applications through several phases until they’re ready for clients. These operations may be scaled, repeated, and controlled by automating them. DevOps teams can deliver regularly with ease, confidence, and peace of mind this way
  • Operate – Maintaining, monitoring, and debugging applications in production environments are all part of the operational phase. Adopting DevOps principles requires teams to work together to achieve system stability, high availability, and zero downtime, all while reinforcing security and governance. DevOps teams strive to discover issues before they have an impact on the customer experience and to mitigate difficulties as quickly as feasible when they do arise. To maintain this vigilance, robust telemetry, actionable alerting, and complete visibility into applications and the underlying system are required

DevOps culture

While implementing DevOps methods uses technology to automate and improve operations, it all starts with the culture within the organization—and the people who contribute to it. The task of developing a DevOps culture demands significant changes in how people work and cooperate. However, when organizations commit to a DevOps culture, they may stimulate the development of high-performing teams.

  • Collaboration, transparency, and alignment – Collaboration across teams, which begins with visibility, is one of the hallmarks of a successful DevOps culture. Different teams, such as development and IT operations, must communicate with one another about their DevOps methods, objectives, and concerns. These teams must also coordinate their efforts and agree on business-related objectives and performance criteria
  • Changes in the scope and responsibility – As teams align, they take ownership and become active in other lifecycle stages, not just the ones that are key to their responsibilities. For example, developers are held accountable not only for the innovation and quality established in the development phase but also for the performance and stability their improvements bring in the operation phase. Meanwhile, IT managers must ensure that governance, security, and compliance are all included during the planning and development phases
  • Shorter release cycles – DevOps teams stay agile by delivering software in short cycles. Because development is gradual, shorter release cycles facilitate planning and risk management while simultaneously reducing the impact on system stability. Shortening the release cycle additionally helps organizations to address the changing consumer requirements and competitive pressures
  • Continuous learning – DevOps teams with a high level of performance have a growth attitude. They fail quickly and apply lessons learned into business processes, constantly improving, enhancing customer happiness, and speeding up innovation and market adaptation. Because DevOps is a journey, there is always space for improvement

DevOps practices

Beyond developing a DevOps culture, teams bring DevOps to life by applying specific practices across the application lifecycle. Some of these approaches assist to speed, automate, and optimize a given phase. Others span many phases, assisting teams in creating seamless systems that boost productivity.

  1. Continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) – Configuration management is the process of controlling the state of a system’s resources, such as servers, virtual machines, and databases. Teams may use configuration management technologies to roll out changes in a controlled, methodical manner, lowering the risks associated with updating system configuration. Teams use configuration management tools to track system states and reduce configuration drift, which is when a system resource’s configuration deviates from the expected state set for it over time. When used in combination with infrastructure as code, system definition and configuration are simple to templatize and automate, allowing teams to manage complicated environments at scale
  2. Version Control – The way of managing code in versions—tracking revisions and change history to make code easier to examine and recover—is known as version control. This method is typically carried out via version control systems such as Git, which allow numerous developers to cooperate on code creation. These solutions provide a clear mechanism for merging code changes that occur in the same files, handling conflicts, and rolling back modifications to previous states. Version control is a key DevOps strategy that assists development teams in working collaboratively, dividing coding jobs among team members, and storing all code for simple recovery if needed. Other methods, such as continuous integration and infrastructure as code, require version control as well
  3. Agile software development – Agile is a software development methodology that stresses teamwork, customer and user input, and high flexibility to change via short release cycles. Agile teams give continuous changes and improvements to clients, collect feedback, and then learn and modify depending on consumer demands and needs. Agile differs significantly from more traditional frameworks such as waterfall, which features extensive release cycles defined by consecutive phases. Kanban and Scrum are two well-known Agile frameworks
  4. Infrastructure as code – Infrastructure as code describes system resources and topologies in a detailed manner, allowing teams to manage those resources as they would code. Those definitions, like code, may be kept and versioned in version control systems, where they can be reviewed and reversed. Using infrastructure as code enables teams to deliver system resources in a more dependable, repeatable, and controlled manner. Infrastructure as code also aids in the automation of deployment and decreases the danger of human mistakes, which is especially important in very large environments. This repeatable, dependable solution for environment deployment enables teams to maintain development and testing environments that are similar to production. Duplicating setups across data centers and cloud platforms is also becoming easier and more efficient
  5. Configuration management – Configuration management is the process of keeping track of the status of a system’s resources, such as servers, virtual machines, and databases. Teams may use configuration management solutions to roll out changes in a controlled, methodical manner, lowering the risks associated with changing the system configuration. Teams use configuration management tools to track system states and reduce configuration drift, which is when a system resource’s configuration deviates from the expected state set for it over time. When used in combination with infrastructure as code, system definition and configuration are simple to templatize and automate, allowing teams to manage complicated environments at scale
  6. Continuous monitoring – Continuous monitoring refers to having complete, real-time insight into the performance and health of the whole application stack, from the program’s underlying infrastructure to higher-level software components. This visibility includes the collecting of telemetry and information, as well as the configuration of alerts for specified circumstances that require the attention of an operator. Telemetry consists of event data and logs gathered from various sections of the system and kept in a location where they can be studied and searched. High-performing DevOps teams ensure that actionable, relevant warnings are issued and that rich telemetry is collected so that massive volumes of data can be analyzed. These insights assist the team in resolving difficulties in real-time and identifying ways to improve the program in future development cycles

Goutam Jha

Add comment

Your Header Sidebar area is currently empty. Hurry up and add some widgets.